UnCommon Grain

Honored to announce UnCommon Grain, an upcoming photo exhibit at The American Whiskey Convention. Photographed by Jordan Bush, the exhibit features photographs of Dick Stoll’s first distillation of Rosen Rye in nearly five decades.

Learn more about Dick Stoll’s Return of Rosen Rye.

From Jordan Bush: “I am thrilled to announce “Uncommon Grain” at the American Whiskey Convention this April. The exhibit documents Stoll & Wolfe Whiskey distilling Rosen Rye, a grain brought back to life made possible by many hands to make a rare type of Pennsylvania rye whiskey not seen in decades. Distillation was photographed over two days using black and white Kodak 35mm film.”

A limited number of photographs and prints from the exhibit will be available for sale at American Whiskey Convention and Stoll & Wolfe Distillery Tasting Room.

To view the exhibit, get American Whiskey Convention tickets here.

Jordan Bush is a Lancaster County based Photographer and Writer. The current author of Lancaster County Magazine’s Foodographer column, Jordan’s journey to capture compelling images spans five continents and a diverse range of subjects from professional sports to man made and ecological disasters, as well as current and past Presidents and VPs.

Rosen Rye Release

30yrs ago today Dick Stoll locked the doors to the historic Pennsylvania Michters Distillery for the last time in history. Today, a new chapter begins. We’re releasing 60 bottles of White Rosen Rye Whiskey available via lottery. Winners announced 2/29. Please visit our site for more info, pricing & entry form. https://www.stollandwolfe.com/rosen

Want to learn more Rosen Rye’s return to PA Whiskey?

Read about the journey from grain to glass. Mashing Rosen Rye Distilling Rosen Rye and Distiller Magazine documents Dick Stoll’s Return to Rosen Rye.

American Whiskey Convention Presents Uncommon Grain by Jordan Bush.

The American Whiskey Convention is proud to present: “Uncommon Grain”, an original art installation by Photographer Jordan Bush. An exclusive selected series of still images taken at Stoll & Wolfe Distillery on September 7th, 2019; the historic day when Rosen rye was distilled into whiskey for the first time in over 50 years. Learn more about American Whiskey Convention in Philadelphia and Get Your Tickets.

Uncommon Grain by Jordan Bush

Distilling Bourbon

Column Still Running at Stoll and Wolfe Distillery

Still cooking away at Stoll and Wolfe distilling Bourbon using the same recipe and process Dick Stoll learned from his mentor Charles E. Beam.

At Stoll and Wolfe we are humbled to learn from such an accomplished teacher and honored/daunted to help preserve and represent a legacy of dedication and hard work of making small batch spirits by hand.

Visit out site to learn more about Dick Stoll’s Legacy and 250 years of local whiskey production.

2019 Whiskey Rebellion – Recap.

Thank you to everyone who braved the July heat and stopped by the inaugural Whiskey Rebellion Whiskey Tasting Tour in Washington, PA.

Always a pleasure to help celebrate 225 years of Pennsylvania Whiskey History while raising money for The Bradford House Historical Association.

Stoll and Wolfe Rye Whiskey and Stoll and Wolfe Bourbon Whiskey bottles on display at the Whiskey Rebellion Festival.
David Bradford House Donation Sign at 2019 Whiskey Rebellion Festival in Washington Pennsylvania.

Thank you to Liberty Pole Spirits family for inviting us to be a part of such a fun event and to Countryside Frame Shop for your hospitality. Rumor has it, plans are already in the works for next year’s festivities.

Lancaster Pennsylvania Whiskey Past, Present and Future

Pre Prohibition Grain Ledger from Historic Bomberger’s Distillery. 
Photo by Jordan Bush from December 2018 Issue of Lancaster County Magazine

“Whether or not you’re a whiskey drinker, it’s difficult to imagine Lancaster’s countryside filled with rye fields and dotted with distilleries. Such a scenario existed during the 18th and early 19th centuries. According to an article read before the Lancaster County Historical Society in the 1920s, 183 distilleries had existed in Lancaster County in 1813. Twenty-seven years later, just ahead of the temperance movement and the Civil War, the county total fell to 102 distilleries (along with 135 grist mills and eight breweries).

A Perfect Recipe

What was the reason behind the proliferation of distilleries? A need grew out an abundance of rye grain harvested across the region’s farmlands. A surplus of rye could fall plague to ergot mold, a hallucinogenic, which some theorize spurred on the Salem Witch Trials. Rather than let crops go to waste, farmers could preserve their rye yield and turn it into a tradable commodity, a currency by the gallon or barrel.”

Click here to read the full article on the Lancaster County Magazine Site.

Boehm Transitions to Beam

“If I may interject a bit of foreshadowing before we temporarily depart from the subject of Kentucky, it’s of note that many early frontier-bound settlers traveled through Pennsylvania. Jacob Boehm was one of them, emigrating from Germany in 1740 to what is now Berks County, which was once a part of Lancaster County. The Boehm family owned land purchased from William Penn in Willow Street, where the Boehm Chapel stands to this day. The family name later changed to one you may find more familiar, “Beam,” which we see today on thousands of bourbon bottles from Kentucky. In 1788, Jacob moved to Kentucky ahead of a legal revolution in the distilling community.”

Click here to read the full article on the Lancaster County Magazine Site.


Kindred Spirits Talk

Learn about 250+ years of local whiskey making tradition with Stoll & Wolfe’s very own Jim Wolfe.

Discover more about the people, places and products behind our local whiskey history and find out why the National Register of Historic Places recognizes our area as the birthplace of the American Whiskey Industry.

Have a historical item (bottle, book, photo, etc.) you’d like to share? Stop on by. Admission is Free.Copy of Untitled.png